October 10th, 2007

beyond pornography

(no subject)

Today, The Onion reports:

WASHINGTON, DC—According to a report released Monday, the cost of American freedom has soared from its previous 1779 high of bravery, sacrifice, fighting for what's right, and 25,071 human lives, up to a record bravery, sacrifice, fighting for what's right, 321,932 human lives, personal privacy, peace of mind, honor, liberty, comfort, and $14.2 billion. Even as it reaches unprecedented levels, most Americans have no choice but to pay for the intangible commodity.

"I suppose you need freedom," said Nancy Holstrom, who was forced to send her two eldest sons to Iraq last month to help defray rising freedom costs.

Government officials said they are committed to exploring all viable alternatives to freedom, including converting to a military dictatorship.
monkey tattoo

And also today...

Rob tells the Gemini:

"If one theorized about the nature of the Creator from a study of creation," said British geneticist J. B. S. Haldane, "it would appear that God has an inordinate fondness for stars and beetles." He drew that inference from the facts that one-fourth of all animal species are beetles and that in the Milky Way Galaxy alone there are a trillion stars for every person on earth. What about you, Gemini? What could we conclude about the nature of your mission here on the planet if we took an inventory of what you create? What are the experiences, products, artifacts, words, feelings, and impressions that you regularly spawn, and what do they say about you? It's an excellent time to meditate on this subject.

That's actually a lot of what's gotten me coding more recently. I've been developing stuff I've thought about for a long time because, damn it, if I don't build it it won't get built. May or may not come to anything, but I still manage to be happier building it than not, you know? Life's better when I'm producing something. Ruby also feels pretty good as a coding language, which helps.

And for my moon sign, Leo:

"As soon as you concern yourself with the 'good' and 'bad' of your fellows," said Morihei Ueshiba, founder of the martial art of aikido, "you create an opening in your heart for maliciousness to enter. Testing, competing with, and criticizing others weaken and defeat you." Make that your hypothesis in the coming week, Leo. Proceed according to the theory that you can feed your strength and power and freedom by accepting other people just the way they are. Assume that one of the surest ways to be happy and successful is to judge no one.

That's a remarkably Buddhist way of looking at it. I mostly try to be that way in social situations, though I find that some level of competition helps keep me ambitious in more professional situations.